Tag Archives: Brent Weeks

I have a story in GdM Issue #11

I just found out I’m sharing an issue of Grimdark Magazine with Brent Weeks.

This is a bit of a special moment for me.

When I was studying sword in rural China, I got sick. Coughing-blood sick. The only way to get medicine was through an IV, and I was set to go home in a few weeks, so I tried to tough it out.

Sifu took me aside one night and said if I didn’t go to the hospital and get the medicine, I’d die. At the time, it felt like a choice between dying now, or dying in ten years from something on a dirty needle.

I stayed up most of the night trying to decide, and struggling to breathe.

I did wind up going to the hospital, and was on an IV for three days. The Night Angel trilogy kept me company while I recovered, and took my mind off whatever consequences I’d have to face for my decision*.
When I got back to the US, my little brother mailed me a copy of his new favorite book, The Way of Shadows.

Everything turned out fine.

*(and my ignorant notions about country hospitals)

gdm11

GdM Issue #11 is up for pre-order, dropping on April 1.

FICTION
– Cry Wolf by Deborah A. Wolf
– Devouring the Dead by Laura Davy
– The First Kill by C.T. Phipps
– For Honour, For Waste by Setsu Uzume (reprint)

NON-FICTION
– The Odd Hopefulness of Grimdark by Matthew Cropley
– An Interview with Anna Smith-Spark
– Review: Mark Lawrence’s Red Sister
– An Interview with Brent Weeks
– Review: Sam McPheeters’ Exploded View

Pre-order now on:
Amazon.com: https://goo.gl/Gl3SsX
Amazon.co.uk: https://goo.gl/GCi3YA
Amazon.com.au: https://goo.gl/yyqhYl
Amazon.ca: https://goo.gl/9P2sBB

Or, sign up for your subscription now over on their Patreon page. You’ll get the issue delivered a few days earlier through here, too: https://goo.gl/jJUm2r

Add this issue on your Goodreads feed here: https://goo.gl/F0YjfM

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Writing Research: Crisis Intervention

I need to venture into a thorny subject for a moment.

One of the short stories I’m working on involves a hero who finds himself in trouble for doing the right thing. It’s in a high-fantasy setting. Most medieval-style stories feature beggars and extreme poverty; so I’ve been researching how social safety-nets, social work, and intervention function in order to integrate them into the setting.

Some key bits of world-building I’ll have to address include:

  • What are the social ills the organization seeks to address?
  • What is the motivation for creating the organization? (Religion was a big one in those days.)
  • How are members of the organization selected and trained?
  • Where does the funding come from?

Issues That Social Safety-Nets Address:

Precedent:

  • Charity in the Middle Ages: Discusses how ideology of charity became institutionalized, some known charitable organizations (Hospitallers of Saint John, Teutonic Order, Trinitarians, etc)  in the dark ages, and who benefited from these charities (the poor, sick, orphans, widows, prostitutes, etc.) The most fascinating tidbit was that these organizations were never centralized because the church couldn’t figure out how to fit them into the bureaucratic clergy. Priorities, guys…
  • Government Welfare Programs in Ancient Rome: Including corn reserves, food stamps, and subsidized education.

Fictional Examples:

  • Excision, by Scott H. Andrews: A fascinating fantasy tale where healers are the heroes, and disease the enemy.
  • Brent Weeks’ Night Angel Trilogy touches on child abuse. In an interview, Weeks mentioned that his wife had been working with abused children when he began writing the series.

Any resources I missed?  Have you read other fantasy stories with social safety-nets?    Share in the comments.

lone